Play games with english book 2

 
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  1. Play Games With English
  2. Play Games with English (Heinemann Games)
  3. Play Games With English 2 (K views)
  4. macmillan - play games with english 2.pdf

macmillan - play games with english myolicotiball.gq - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or view presentation slides online. Play Games With English 2 - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read Play Games With English Teacher's Resource Book 3 (ELT Photocopiables. Play Games With English: Book Two (Heinemann Games). Home · Play Games With Word Games with English: Bk. 2 (Heinemann games). Read more.

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Play Games With English Book 2

Play Games with English (Heinemann Games) MACMILLAN HEINEMANN English Language Teaching TEACHERIS RESOURCE BOOK COLIN 0 7 Play Games With English Teacher's Resource Book 2 Colin Granger 0 1: Teachers' Resource Book (Book) by John Series: Heinemann Games S. Dos libros de lecturas Play games with English 2, Heinemann. English teaching. Play Games With English: Book Two (Heinemann Games) (Bk. 2) [Colin Granger] on myolicotiball.gq *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A collection of graded.

A collection of graded games and puzzles for ELT students, in which each activity focuses on a particular language feature. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Read more Read less. Read more. Product details Series: Heinemann Games Paperback: Heinemann June 1, Language:

Player 5: Player 1: I've got a cake, two pens and a book.

I've got a cake, two pens, a book and six keys. I've got a cake, a book This player makes a memory mistake and so gets a minus point.

I've got a cake, two pens, a book, six keys and an apple. I've got a cake, two pens, And so on. You could then begin a new game with a different basic sentence, e. He's got a car The player with the least number of minus points at the end of the game is the winner.

Playa trial round before playing properly. Cardinal Numbers: The first player calls out one, the next player two, the next three, and so on, around the class. As soon as the number five or any multiple thereof 10, 15, 20, 25, etc. If the number contains a five but is not a multiple of five, only part of it is replaced by buzz, e. Players get minus points if they a forget to say buzz; or b hesitate too long. Fizz is played exactly like Buzz, except the players say fizz for sevens or multiples of seven.

Look at the picture for two minutes. Cover the picture. Write down all 3 the things you can remember. It's a telephone. What's this? Divide the class into two teams Team A and Team B. The two teams take it in turns to ask the other team What's this? For example: Team Team Team Team A: It's an alarm-clock. It's a light. The players in each team should take it in turns to ask and answer questions. Score 1 point per correct question, 2 points per correct answer. The team with the most points at the end is the winner.

It's an alarm clock. It's a tap. They're blankets. What's that? What are those? It's a window. Continue as above but this time with questions about objects in the room. Introduce the use of this and these for near and that and those for far singular and plural objects, by providing some example questions before playing the game. You could make the vocabulary more interesting and varied by getting the players to place personal possessions in view.

Divide the class into small teams of two to three players. Appoint team secretaries. Set a time limit of five minutes for the team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, to write down what the various jobs are. The team with the most correct sentences is the winner. He's a dentist. He's a gardener. She's a teacher. They're decorators. She's a nurse. He's a chef. He's a window cleaner.

They're waitresses. They're secretaries. Are you Yes, I am. Ask one of the players to write the name of a job on a slip of paper and hand it to you, without any of the other players seeing it. Mime an action which is associated with the job. Your mime does not have to be good, in fact it is better if you do not mime the job too clearly as this makes it too easy to guess what the job is.

Then get the rest of the players to try to guess your job: Are you a doctor? Are you a butcher? Answer with Yes, I am or No, I'm not. Give further mime or verbal hints if the class find it impossible to guess, e. You can also guide the class to the right answer by saying a definite no if they are way off the mark, and an encouraging no if they are getting warm. The player who guesses the right answer gets the chance to mime the next job for the others to guess, and so on, until everyone has had a turn.

Encourage interesting jobs by suggesting jobs for the students to take on, e. Use these words: He's shaving. Divide the class into small teams of two to three players and appoint team secretaries. Set a time limit of five to eight minutes for the team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, to write down the actions being mimed in the pictures.

She's playing the piano. He's cleaning his teeth. He's going upstairs. She's combing her hair. She's drinking a cup of tea. He's driving. She's telephoning. Present Continuous: Are you combing your hair?

Ask one of the players to write an action on a slip of paper and hand it to you, without any of the other players seeing it. Mime the action for the rest of the group to guess: Are you brushing your hair? Your mime does not have to be good - the more amateur the mime, the more questions will have to be asked.

Give verbal hints if necessary. The player who guesses the right answer then gets the chance to mime an action for the others to guess, and so on, until everyone has had a turn. If the players cannot think of an action to mime, you could suggest washing hands, telephoning, driving a car, playing chess, lighting a fire, making an omelette, having a shower. Another variant of the game is to suggest different categories such as eating something, cooking something, doing something in the house, playing a game.

Each player then has to mime, for example, eating a different kind of food for the others to guess, e. Set a time limit of three to five minutes for the team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, to write the opposites.

The team with the most correct opposites is the winner. He's got a blue car. Write up the basic structure He's got alan Begin the game by saying He's got a blue car. Explain that each player in turn has to say the same sentence but with a different adjective, for example: Player 2: Player 3: He's got an old car.

He's got a fast car. He's got a comfortable car. Players get minus points if they a are unable to think of a new adjective; b repeat an adjective which has been previously used; c use an inappropriate adjective; or d hesitate too long. He's got '" This player hesitates too long and so gets a minus point. He's got a slow car. He's got a new car. Start a new round of the game with a different base sentence and a different vocabulary area as soon as players begin to run out of ideas.

Suggestions for further games: They've got alan C;OOD --I 4. I'm watching television in the living room. Working individually or in pairs , the players have to write down as many sentences as they can in the five minute time limit. The player with the most correct sentences is the winner. She's having a shower in the bathroom.

We're eating sandwiches in the kitchen. She's writing a letter in the living room. We're making tea in the kitchen. He's reading a book in living room. They're cleaning their teeth in the bathroom. I'm listening to music in the living room. They're putting on their clothes in the bedroom. We're playing table tennis in the bedroom. He's washing the dishes in the kitchen. Is he eating an apple? Yes, he is. Draw a simple sketch of someone doing something.

Do not let anyone see what you are drawing. The class then has to try. Answer with short answers, e. Is he Is he Is he Is he reading? No, he isn't. Continue the game either by getting the player who guessed correctly to draw someone doing something for the others to guess, or by drawing the sketches yourself and giving them to different players to use.

Some suggested drawings: Alternatively, you could use pictures cut out from magazines. Choose a picture. Find the room. She drives a car. Give the teams ten to fifteen minutes to study the picture and for the team secretaries, helped by the rest of the players in their team, to write down sentences about Nicola.

You could also ask the teams to point out the evidence for their statements, e. She plays the guitar. There's a guitar near the record player. She She She She plays the guitar. She She She She drinks coffee. Present Simple: You eat sweets.

Ask the class to empty out the contents of their pockets, handbags, briefcases, etc. The class then has to deduce things about each player in turn, e.

You travel by bus. You will probably manage to persuade everyone to reveal their personal possessions if you start off with your own things. If this does prove to be a problem, bring in a number of objects and assign them to fictitious characters.

Nicola is a student. This is her room. Write eight more sentences about Nicola. Use these verbs: There's a shirt. There are some magazines. The team secretaries, helped by the other players in their team, then have to write down what is in the suitcase. They must not look at the picture while doing this.

Each team then reads out their list of sentences. Alternatively, score two points if the sentences are both grammatically and factually correct, one point if only factually correct. The team with the most points is the winner. There are some socks. There are two pairs of sunglasses. There are some handkerchiefs. There's a comb. There are three ties. Place a large number of objects on a table or desk. It would be better if you could do this without the class seeing you. Allow the class one minute to study what is on the table.

Then cover the objects. Then ask the class questions about what is on the table. Take care to ask questions which require a negative as well as a positive answer. Is there a glass on the table? Is there a cup on the table? Are there any files on the table? Is there any tea on the table? No, there isn't. Allow the class a few moments for consultation before they answer. Write their answers up in note form, e. Then uncover the objects and award 1 point for each correct answer.

Then get the class to test your memory. Look at this picture for two minutes. What's in the suitcase? Write down all the things you can remember.

Use these nouns: She answers the telephone. Working individually or in pairs , the players write down two sentences for each character. Set a ten to fifteen- minute time limit. Sally answers the telephone. Kate writes on the blackboard.

Jason gives change. Steve wallpapers rooms. Bob cuts the grass. Carol takes photographs. She types letters. She marks homework. He serves customers. He paints doors. He waters the flowers. She develops films. Do you work outside? Yes, he does. Introduce some useful vocabulary for this game by discussing your own job, for example: What's my job?

What do I teach? Where do I work? Who do I work for? Do I work inside or outside? Do I wear special clothes for my job? You're a teacher. You teach English. You work in a school. You work for You work inside.

No, you don't. Write the name of a job on a slip of paper, and assign it to a fictitious friend. The class has to guess the job by asking Does questions, for example: Does he work outside? Does he earn a lot of money? No, he doesn't. The two teams take it in turns to write down the name of a job for the other team to guess. Each team has 20 questions with which to find out the job. Write up the score, like this: If Team B gets the answer in fourteen questions, write: Team B If Team B fails to guess the job in twenty questions, write: At the end, the team with the lowest total is the winner.

Play Games With English

Suggest that the teams allocate each job to a particular member of the team; in this way, various forms can be practised, e. Does she drive a bus? Do you work with children? Encourage the teams to choose unusual jobs bullfighter, astronaut, gangster, nun, clown, etc.

Prepositions of Place: There's a mouse in the cupboard. Working individually or in pairs , the players write down as many sentences as they can in the five minute time limit. Alternatively, you could play this as a speed game, telling the players that there are sixteen mice which they have to locate in the picture.

The first player to write the sixteen sentences correctly is the winner. There's a mouse: Is the ring on something? You need two small objects for this game, for example, a ring and a pair of scissors. It is important that one of these objects should be something that requires the plural, e. Leave the room for a short time, telling the class to hide the two objects in two separate places while you are gone.

Come back into the room and first ask questions to find out where the ring is hidden, e. Is it under something? Is it behind something? Is it behind the curtains? No, it isn't. When you have found the ring try to locate the scissors: Are the scissors in something?

Then the players can take over the guessing role by leaving the room for a moment while the objects are hidden in new places. To score this game, count the number of questions each player requires before finding the objects. The player with the lowest number is the winner. With a large class, speed up the game by sending more than one player out of the room at a time, and having them ask questions in turn.

If you want to avoid sending players out of the room, imaginary hiding places could be written down. The player who does this in the shortest time is the winner. The team secretaries, helped by the other players in their team, have to write down six words of five to six letters. Check to make sure that the words they choose are not too difficult.

A player from Team A then writes up the same number of dashes as there are letters in his or her team's first word. Team B has to guess what the letters are and eventually what the word is by calling out letters. If Team B says a letter which is in the word, the player from Team A replaces the appropriate dash or dashes with the letter. If Team B says a letter which is not in the word, the player from Team A draws a part of a gallows, in the order in which the parts are numbered: If the drawing of the gallows is completed i.

If Team B guesses the word before the drawing is completed, Team B wins a point. One player from Team A writes up: E A draws the base of the gallows because there is no E in grass: B says: A A fills in: N 1 Team A draws: Team B says: S Team A fills in: ASS And so on. Practise pronouncing the alphabet before playing the game. You could introduce the rule that the letter a team calls out stands even if they meant a different letter.

Playa practice round before playing properly. He's got a pair of trainers. They've got some glasses. Photocopy pages 29 and 93 to play this game. Hand out page 29 and give the teams two minutes to study and memorise the pictures. Then get the teams to cover or hand you back page Hand out page 93 and go through the example with the class. The team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, then write down what the various people in the pictures have got.

They must not look back at the first page while doing this. Alternatively, score 2 points if the sentences are both grammatically and factually correct, 1 point if only factually correct. She's got some books.

He's got a watch. She's got a walkman. He's got a tennis racket. She's got a mobile phone. Carmen has got a diary.

Begin the game by getting a student to hold up a possession and say what he or she has got, e. I've got a diary. Explain that the next player has to say what the first player has got and then hold up a possession of his or her own and make a new sentence, e.

The game continues with each player in turn trying to remember what the preceding players have got and then adding a new item of their own. Players get minus points if they a make a memory mistake, or b hesitate too long. Do not give minus points to players who make grammar mistakes - just correct the mistake and let the player continue.

Player 4: Player 6: Player 7: Carmen has got a diary and I've got some keys. Gerald has got some keys and I've got a pencil. Gerald has got some keys. Sophia has got a pencil and I've got some pens. Sophia has got a pen Player 5 gets a minus point for making a memory mistake. Trudi has got some stamps and I've got an envelope. The players with the least number of minus points at the end of the game are the winners. Playa trial round before starting to award minus points. Try to memorise their presents.

Turn the page over.

Play Games with English (Heinemann Games)

Answer the questions on the second page. It's their birthday today. What presents have they got? Can you switch on the light? Set a ten-minute time limit for the team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, to write the questions. The team with the most correct questions is the winner.

Can you open the door? Can you answer the telephone? Can you pass me the telephone book? Can you close the window? Can you get me a coffee? Can you switch off the computer? Can Requests: Can you clean the board? First, give a few examples yourself by requesting students to do things in the classroom situation, e. Then divide the class into teams of four to six players and appoint team secretaries.

The team secretaries, helped by the rest of their team, should then write five different requests using different verbs. Go round as they do this checking that the questions are correct and possible to carry out in the classroom situation.

Each team in-turn then makes a request to a named player in the team next to them. They must choose a different player each time.

The named player wins a point for his or her team if he or she understands and carries out the request. Angelica closes the window and wins a point for Team B. Can you fetch me the waste paper bin? I'm sorry. I don't understand. Team C doesn't get a point. Can you give this pen to Valerie? Of course. Manolo gives the pen to Valerie and wins a point for Team D.

What are the people asking? Begin each sentence with 'Can you.. It hasn't got a handle. They haven't got any headlights. The team secretaries, helped by the other players in their team, have to write down as many sentences as they can in the two-minute time limit. It hasn't got a dial. It hasn't got a tail. It hasn't got any taps. It hasn't got a door. They haven't got any saddles. They haven't got any laces. There are some pencils.

You will need a large number of different objects for this game, e. Make sure that some of these things are uncountable nouns e. Place some of the objects on a table or desk. Ask the players in Team A to look at what is on the table for one minute. Then, without Team A seeing, remove three objects e. Then ask Team A to come back and look at the table once more and say a what is missing; and b what is new: There There There There are some pencils.

Score 2 points for each correct observation; but only 1 point if the grammar is wrong. Repeat with Team B. At the end, the team with the most points is the winner. There is a deliberate mistake in these pictures. Find what is missing. You have two minutes.

It's very big. It lives in Africa. Have got: It has got a long tail. Can Ability: It can run very fast. The teams have to join the pictures of the animals to the descriptions. The first team to complete the quiz correctly is the winner. You could get the players to write similar descriptions of other animals for the rest of the group to guess.

Is it a big animal? Does it eat meat? No, it doesn't. Has it got four legs? Can it climb trees? Yes, it cen. No, it can't. Write the name of an animal on a slip of paper.

Explain that the class has to guess what animal you have written in 20 questions. Guide the class to ask questions with the following patterns: Is it Does it.. Has it got Can it Write up the patterns as they are introduced. Answer their questions with short form answers, i. No, it isn't, etc. Divide the class into two teams Team A and Team 8. Each team writes down the name of three animals.

Check that there is no duplication of names. Team 8 then has 20 questions to find what Team A's first animal is. Each member of Team A takes it in turns to answer the questions. Write up the score like this: If Team 8 gets the answer in fourteen questions, write: If Team 8 fails to guess what the animal is in twenty questions, write: Then it is Team A's turn to try to guess Team 8's first animal, and so on with the other four animals.

At the end, the team with the lowest score is the winner. A It's very big. It's strong. It is grey. It eats leaves. It has got four legs.

B It's very small. It lives in nearly all countries. It likes cheese. C It is very long. It has not got any legs. It eats small animals.

It is sometimes dangerous.

Play Games With English 2 (K views)

D It can run very fast. It has got a very long neck. It has got four long legs. E It can fly. It can dive. It's usually white. It eats fish and lives by the sea. F It can swim in the sea and walk on the land. It cannot fly. It eats fish. It lives in very cold countries. G It looks like a horse. It eats grass. It has got black and white stripes.

H It has got fingers. It can climb trees. It is brown. It lives on nuts and fruit. It lives in Africa and Asia.

F'aJCUtN 1. She likes cheese, but she doesn't like meat. Working individually or in pairs, the players have to write down what the aunt likes and dislikes. Write up their answers after asking how the nouns books, magazines, etc. She likes books, but she doesn't like magazines. She likes coffee, but she doesn't like tea. Introduce the phrase double 0, double E, etc.

In this way the players should be able to guess that the aunt only likes things if they are spelt with a double letter. After they have found out the solution you could extend this game by asking the players to write down as many items that the aunt would like as they can think of, e. What colours does she like? What sports does she like? What languages does she like? The players write green, yellow, etc.

Russian, Greek, etc. And so on, with different categories. She likes sheep, but she doesn't like cows. She likes chess, but she doesn't like cards. She likes apples, but she doesn't like bananas. She likes dresses, but she doesn't like skirts.

She likes spoons, but she doesn't like forks. She likes doors, but she doesn't like windows. She only likes things spelt with a double letter, e.

She comes from Woollamalloo, you see! Does she like to cook? Yes, she likes to cook.! No, she doesn't like to cook. Tell the class that you too have a rather peculiar aunt, this time from Edinburgh, who likes to do some things and dislikes doing others.

By asking Does she like The solution this time is that she only likes to do actions which begin with a vowel. Does she like to eat? Yes, she likes to eat. Does she like to read? No, she doesn't like to read. Does she like to ask questions? Yes, she likes to ask questions. Tell anybody who you feel knows the answer to keep it to themselves for the moment and to carryon playing the game getting positive answers from you each time. You could also involve these players in helping you decide what the aunt likes and dislikes doing.

Play until most students have found the solution. You could then ask the players to try to invent an aunt of their own for the rest of the class to guess. My Aunt from Slough who only likes nouns spelt with silent letters, e. My Aunt from Hull who only likes verbs with four letters, e. Practise Do you like questions by playing one game with Find out what I like rather than Find out what my aunt likes. The woman is opening her umbrella. Working individually or in pairs , the players write down the differences in what the people are doing between Picture A and Picture B.

They should write full sentences to do this. Set a ten minute time limit. In picture B: It is raining.

macmillan - play games with english 2.pdf

The man is getting out of the car. The man is smoking a pipe. The man is reading a newspaper. The boy is running down the steps. Are you eating something? No, I'm not eating. Some kind of screen is necessary for this game. You could construct one by putting two chairs on top of a table or desk and then covering them with a cloth or some coats. Each player, in turn, goes behind the screen to carry out an action which makes some recognisable sound, e. The rest of the class has to guess what is being done.

Player behind screen: Are No, Are No, you eating something? I'm not eating. I'm not drinking You could vary this game by putting behind the screen a number of objects which the players could choose to use e.

Write what is different in picture B. Possessive's Genitive: They're Nick's chairs. Working individually or in pairs , the players write down who the different objects belong to. The first player to do this correctly is the winner. Whose chairs are these? They're his. It's hers. Whose uniform is this? It's Teresa's uniform. Complete the key.

F rexom le: Please type or write clearly. A Picnic intfie Country Look at this busy scene in the country. What are people doing? Someone's reading. Someone's swimming.

Someone's driving. Someone's climbing. Someone's drinking. Someone's riding. Someone's resting. Someone's fighting. Someone's jumping. Someone's sewing. Write them out in full For exam ple: Q All the answers are connected with position.

Use the rabbit to help you. What is the feminine of these words? Can you name and describe the clothes these people are wearing? Put the correct word from list A with the correct description from list B. A Forexample: Alar'ge l. T-shirt patterned 3. Look at these groups of words. Which word does not fit? The words are horizontal , vertical , or diagonal Q. Look at these everyday situations. Do you know what to say? What's the matter? Good Luck. That's a pity. Excuse me. Mind out!

May I introduce you to Peter Brown? What a surprise! No thank you. How do you do? Do you know the abbreviation for these 2 words? These 8 people have problems. What services do they need? Can you find the solutions in the box? Look at Susan's Christmas presents. Who are they for? Put the correct names on her list. All the answers are connected with punctuation and writing. Do you know them all? Person or Thing? Here are 20 words which end in —er.

Which of them is a person and which is a thing? Make 2 lists. The words are horizontal O vertical 0 or diagonal The hats will help you. Word Families 2 Can you put these words into 5 different subject groups? There are 4 words in each. Atlantic Brown is talking to her au pair girl Marie and asking her to do different things in the house.

Look at the pictures and tell Marie what to do. Look at the pictures and answer the questions. What did the thieves damage? What did the thieves use? Is it a a bottle of wine — or b a wine bottle? It is a a cup of coffee or b a coffee cup? Is it a a matchbox or b a box of matches? Is it a a sculpture of a woman "U or b a sculpture by a woman? Show the way you would go, following the numbers on the list. Many words in English are made of two parts. Put the word from list A with the correct word from list B.

How would you say thank you in these situations? Work for us I Look at these job advertisements. Can you fill in the missing words? Lei eat 2 Lookatth g p fw d F dthew d wh hd. Can you choose the correct explanation? Identify the objects in A and B. Each object from A can go into one of the objects in B.

Can you put them together? Tobacco 8- 3. All the answers are connected with entertainment. BAO4 8: All these items are from pages of a newspaper. Can you fill in the Contents List? Diners lub N, Nranubs into. He was outside the bank, alone, chipping frozen snow from thepavement.

On Feb 21st at Klna's 7 ,. Sophie and Justine. IKS Here are I2 students working in the college library. Look carefully at the titles of the books they are reading. What subjects are the students studying? They are all connected up and are '3 associated with transport and movement. Norway 2. Wales 3.

Argentina 4. Cyprus 5. Denmark 6. Portugal 7. Thailand 8. Panama 9. New Zealand IO. Turkey I I. United States I2. Sweden I Page3 ashtray, matchbox. Family name 2. First name 4. Date of birth 5. Place ofbirth 6. Marital status 7. Children 8. Present address 9. Previous experience I3.

Present position I4. Present salary I 5. Languages spoken I 6. Driving licence I7. Interests I8. Names and addresses of 2 referees I9. Date available Date 2. Someone's crying. Someone's shaving. Someone's hurrying. Someone's laughing. Someone's hiding. Someone's standing. Someone's leaving. Someone's shooting. Someone's watching. Someone's running. Check in here VAT — value added tax maths.

Ring for service 2. Messages for guests 4. Luggage 5. Laundry 6.

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